A Dog’s Purpose?

There is a film coming up this year called A Dog’s Purpose. When films with animals are made, they are done with people there to make sure the animals are not harmed or distressed in any way.

Do they mean physical harm or mental harm? Some film-makers will force their animals to do something they don’t want to. Some animals are put into a distressed position and forced to do something they are scared of.

Would we do that with a child? Would we force a five or six-year-old to do something they were terrified of?

Why do some film-makers think it is okay to do it to the animals. Then say no animal was harmed because no limbs broke. That animal may well be terrified of the position it was put in, and not go anywhere near that again, or even wet itself because of the terror it faced.

No animal should be harmed mentally or physically when put in a film. Use CGI if necessary. There are companies who can do that.

*WARNING – THERE IS A DOG IN DISTRESS IN THIS VIDEO*

The Duck (A Story From An Anonymous Friend)

A friend wrote this, and I said I would share it on my blog. The friend requested I not name them. It is a fun story.

THE DUCK

My agent says it won’t fly.
Which is apt, considering the subject of my latest children’s book.
He says he can’t find a publisher.
That, in fact, it is unpublishable in its current form.
And I need to change the title.
But, I argue, the title is also the hook, the line that repeats at the end of each segment.
It is the question each animal asks, and therefore the child who is listening, or perhaps even reading, will anticipate and remember.
This is how children learn to read, and to love reading.
The story tells of a cute little duckling who gets lost.
His whole family, Daddy, Mummy, and his seven siblings, Donald, David, Drew, Dottie, Debbie, Deirdre and Mary, go out searching for him.
Each of them meets a different animal, and explains the situation.
And each encounter ends up with the same punch line.
It is a good story, I say, built in the classic style of great children’s stories.
With an adorable collection of fluffy little creatures and an exotic array of animals – a giraffe, a fox, a crocodile, a kangaroo, a monkey, a dog, a hippo, a little bird and, of course, an elephant – you have everything needed for a great book that kids will treasure.
The publishers will not publish, he says, they say parents won’t buy it. Not with that title.
So I am faced with a rewrite.
Or, I guess, I could self-publish, prove them all wrong.
I ask you, dear reader, would you refuse to buy a book on the basis of its title?
It is catchy.
And funny.
Where the f*ck’s the duck?

Photo of the Week 2016 – Week 3

My cat, Sully is such a gorgeous little thing. He loves the three tier posts we brought the cats for Christmas. The top level is his favourite. He will lay there and go to sleep, or attack the little ball toys attached to the second level, or just attack the other cat as he goes past.

2016 Week 3

Sunday Photo “Fiction” – Gyp

126 10 October 18th 2015

Sunday Photo Fiction can be found here.

Somewhere in the distance there was the sound of barking, and the smell of smoke. She couldn’t understand what it was, but as she started to wake up, Doris realised that no longer being in the dream should have removed the smell of the smoke as well. Her eyes opened with a start at the sound of renewed barking from outside her bedroom door and the scratching.

Throwing a robe around herself, she opened the door and coughed at the smell of smoke. It was not coming from her flat though. Doris ran through her hallway and saw a slight drip coming from the top left corner of her front room ceiling. She felt cold creep over her at the thought of the family living upstairs.

Running outside, Doris started yelling “FIRE!” as loud as she could and started banging on the door of the maisonette above her. Looking up, she could see an orange glow flickering in the window. She banged some more, still shouting, and noticed lights in other houses coming on. At 3am, she was glad she could wake someone. The light behind the door came on and she heard muffled shouting, followed less than a minute later by a man and woman running out. The man was holding the hand of a six year old boy, and had a four year old in his arms. The woman had a twenty-two month old daughter in her arms.

The dog had just saved five lives.

———-

I was the four year old in my father’s arms and the dog, Gyp, received an award for saving our lives in 1971.

The photo is not Gyp, the photo is Bob, the statue of a dog at the Battle of Britain Memorial in Capel-le-Ferne, Kent, UK.