You Sing A Spell Chequer On A Poem

John Robinson runs a new blog since he retired his Daily Graff one which he calls The After Graff (an amalgamation of GRoan and lAFF). He now only posts on a Saturday with words of wisdom, a photo and a few words he wanted to share.

This week, his words focused on the misspelling of tomorrow. When I looked for words I commonly misspelled (with misspell being one of them) I found a poem that was posted in the comments.

This poem does not belong to me. I did not write it. I am copying what someone shared four years ago. 

Eye have a spelling chequer,
It came with my Pea Sea.
It plane lee marks four my revue
Miss Steaks I can knot sea.

Eye strike the quays and type a whirred
And weight four it two say
Weather eye am write oar wrong
It tells me straight a weigh.

Eye ran this poem threw it,
Your shore real glad two no.
Its vary polished in its weigh.
My chequer tolled me sew.

Translation:

I have a spelling checker
It came with my PC
It plainly marks for my review
Mistakes I cannot see

I strike the keys and type a word
And wait for it to say
Whether I am right or wrong
It tells me straight away

I ran this poem through it
You’re sure real glad to know
It’s very polished in its way
My checker told me so

Mind If I Pop Up?

I changed my “A Mixed Bag” icon today and changed it my random post widget on the right. I decided to make sure it worked and clicked it a few times. One of the posts it landed on made me laugh, as the picture always does. I thought I would share it again as it has been a couple of years.

Now, imagine you have phobias. I know some of you do, whether that be spiders, clowns, snakes, eyes, webs, or anything else. You go into a bookshop and find this. Do you read it, or leave it?

Pop-up-Book-of-Phobias-ii

Image found on the internet

The Duck (A Story From An Anonymous Friend)

A friend wrote this, and I said I would share it on my blog. The friend requested I not name them. It is a fun story.

THE DUCK

My agent says it won’t fly.
Which is apt, considering the subject of my latest children’s book.
He says he can’t find a publisher.
That, in fact, it is unpublishable in its current form.
And I need to change the title.
But, I argue, the title is also the hook, the line that repeats at the end of each segment.
It is the question each animal asks, and therefore the child who is listening, or perhaps even reading, will anticipate and remember.
This is how children learn to read, and to love reading.
The story tells of a cute little duckling who gets lost.
His whole family, Daddy, Mummy, and his seven siblings, Donald, David, Drew, Dottie, Debbie, Deirdre and Mary, go out searching for him.
Each of them meets a different animal, and explains the situation.
And each encounter ends up with the same punch line.
It is a good story, I say, built in the classic style of great children’s stories.
With an adorable collection of fluffy little creatures and an exotic array of animals – a giraffe, a fox, a crocodile, a kangaroo, a monkey, a dog, a hippo, a little bird and, of course, an elephant – you have everything needed for a great book that kids will treasure.
The publishers will not publish, he says, they say parents won’t buy it. Not with that title.
So I am faced with a rewrite.
Or, I guess, I could self-publish, prove them all wrong.
I ask you, dear reader, would you refuse to buy a book on the basis of its title?
It is catchy.
And funny.
Where the f*ck’s the duck?

A Rare Repost – An Ulterior Motive (The Daily Graff)

It is very rare for me to do a repost or reblog, but I thought I would make an exception. John Robinson (the blogger, not the pilgrim) wrote a book of letters over a ten year period. I have reviewed this book before here, so I thought I would link to his post.

Click on the image below to go to John’s post.

thedailygraff